People who inject drugs

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April 12, 2018

UNAIDS has just relaunched its Key Populations Atlas, an online tool that provides a range of information about members of key populations worldwide, including sex workers, gay men and other men who have sex with men, peo

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April 11, 2018

Sharing of equipment used for injecting drug use (IDU) is a substantial cause of disease burden and a contributor to blood-borne virus transmission.

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April 10, 2018

People who inject drugs are at high risk of acquiring hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) due to risky injection and sexual practices.

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February 5, 2018

Though timely initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a vital component of effective HIV prevention, care and treatment, people who inject drugs are less likely to receive ART than their non-drug using counterparts.

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November 22, 2017

Remarkable progress is being made on HIV treatment. Ahead of World AIDS Day, UNAIDS has launched a new report showing that access to treatment has risen significantly. In 2000, just 685 000 people living with HIV had access to antiretroviral therapy.

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November 9, 2017

In all countries where there is an HIV epidemic, certain subgroups of the population are at greater risk of HIV than others. These “key” populations include female sex workers (FSWs), men who have sex with men (MSM), transgender people, and people who inject drugs.

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June 26, 2017

Mounting evidence suggests that laws and policies prohibiting illegal drug use could have a central role in shaping health outcomes among people who inject drugs (PWID).

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November 18, 2016

Previous estimates of the burden of HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) among people who inject drugs have not included estimates of the burden attributable to the consequences of past injecting.

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September 12, 2016

We interviewed 15 South Africans seeking HIV testing to understand the factors that influenced their seeking an HIV test. Reasons in favour of testing included having had unprotected sex, availability of social support if testing HIV positive and modelling test-seeking behaviour to others.

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September 12, 2016

The prevalence of HIV, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and tuberculosis are higher in prisons than in the general population in most countries worldwide.