Key and vulnerable populations

Blog
October 29, 2018
Of no surprise to those in the HIV field, the epidemic continues to be fueled by stigma, none more evident than among key and mobile populations, such as people who inject drugs and sex workers. Speakers at the Southern African HIV Clinicians Society conference shared their experiences in working with these groups and challenged participants to view them as people – and not merely a public health problem.  
Blog
October 26, 2018
Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) programs have been incredibly successful across southern Africa. However, presentations at the second day of the Southern African HIV Clinicians Society Conference highlighted important gaps in pediatric testing and treatment.
Resource
October 26, 2018
PrEP could complement established HIV prevention strategies for pregnant and breastfeeding women as part of a comprehensive package to reduce HIV infections among women and transmission from mothers to infants in settings with high HIV incidence.
Resource
October 26, 2018
Since 2016, WHO has recommended tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) + lamivudine (3TC) (or emtricitabine, FTC) + efavirenz (EFV) 600 mg as the preferred first- line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen for adults and adolescents. WHO recommended dolutegravir (DTG) as an alternative option to EFV for first-line ART because of the uncertainty regarding the safety and efficacy of DTG during pregnancy and among people living with HIV receiving rifampicin-based tuberculosis (TB) treatment. New WHO interim guidelines contain recommendations regarding preferred first-line regimens for adults, adolescents and children initiating ART, which now include DTG and RAL.
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October 17, 2018
In our fifth issue, we have assembled 70 abstracts published from August through September 2018 that feature evidence from Botswana (3), Eswatini (5), Lesotho (2), Malawi (8), Mozambique (3), Namibia (3), South Africa (40), Tanzania (1), Zambia (12) and Zimbabwe (9).
Blog
October 16, 2018
Through the many presentations, activities and events during the three days of the 2nd International Workshop on HIV Adolescence: Challenges and Solutions, the emphasis on youth involvement was highlighted consistently. It is through this lens that SHARE staff reflect on thoughts from youth participants before its closing.
Blog
October 12, 2018
Looking at where we have come from, and where we are in southern Africa’s fight against HIV, it is clear that we have had some monumental successes and some incredible failures along the way, both of which we can learn from to do better. One clear theme throughout the first day of the 2nd International Workshop on HIV Adolescence: Challenges and Solutions was that we have not consistently and adequately gained the insights of the very people who are enrolled in studies to generate evidence on how to address the needs of these populations. Further, we have not committed the resources required to conduct the research on the populations that are difficult to reach, whether due to challenging ethical enrolment or stigma and criminalization of key populations.
Blog
October 12, 2018
Despite the fact that people under the age of 18 make up about 25% of the global population, research among adolescents has been a neglected area. We know that it is important to conduct research among pediatric and adolescent populations, but to date the focus has remained on adults. Just how significant the risks are of not including adolescents in clinical trials emerged as a key theme at the 2nd International Workshop on HIV Adolescence, as well as the logistical, ethical, legal, justice, and human rights considerations that need to be taken into account when designing and implementing research involving adolescents.
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October 10, 2018
Children and adolescents have poorer HIV treatment outcomes than adults. We aimed to assess the effect of community-based support for caregivers of HIV-infected children and adolescents, who are key mediators to children engaging with care, on treatment outcomes.
Resource
October 10, 2018
Despite their heightened risk of sexually transmitted infections, minor adolescents (<18 years old) are often excluded from clinical trials. The results of trials of adults should not be assumed to generalize to minors.