targeted testing

The disconnect between individual-level and population-level HIV prevention benefits of antiretroviral treatment

In 2019, the HIV pandemic is growing and soon over 40 million people will be living with HIV. Effective population-based approaches to decrease HIV incidence are as relevant as ever given modest reductions observed over the past decade. Treatment as prevention is often heralded as the path to improve HIV outcomes and to reduce HIV incidence.

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Improvements in the South African HIV care cascade: Findings on 90‐90‐90 targets from successive population‐representative surveys in North West Province

To achieve epidemic control of HIV by 2030, countries aim to meet 90‐90‐90 targets to increase knowledge of HIV‐positive status, initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and viral suppression by 2020. This study assessed the progress towards these targets from 2014 to 2016 in South Africa as expanded treatment policies were introduced using population‐representative surveys. It concludes that achieving the first 90 target will require targeted and improved testing models for men.
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Community intervention improves knowledge of HIV status of adolescents in Zambia: findings from HPTN 071-PopART for youth study

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Yes
Author
Shanaube, Kwame; Schaap, Ab; Chaila, Mwate Joseph; Floyd, Sian; Mackworth-Young, Constance; Hoddinott, Graeme; Hayes, Richard; Fidler, Sarah; Ayles, Helen

Objective: To determine the uptake of home-based HIV counselling and testing (HCT) in four communities of the HPTN 071 (PopART) trial in Zambia among adolescents aged 15–19 years and explore factors associated with HCT uptake.

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Should HIV testing for all pregnant women continue? Cost-effectiveness of universal antenatal testing compared to focused approaches across high to very low HIV prevalence settings

Is the resource available on the Internet?
Yes
Author
Ishikawa, N., Dalal, S., Johnson, C., et al.

HIV testing is the entry point for the elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Decreasing external funding for the HIV response in some low- and middle-income countries has triggered the question of whether a focused approach to HIV testing targeting pregnant women in high-burden areas should be considered. This study aimed at determining and comparing the cost-effectiveness of universal and focused HIV testing approaches for pregnant women across high to very low HIV prevalence settings.

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