stigma and discrimination

Engaging study participants in interpreting results: lessons from the TRIO study in Kenya and South Africa

Background: Women account for 56% of new HIV infections in sub-Saharan Africa. Multipurpose Prevention Technologies (MPTs) are promising interventions because they combine HIV prevention with a less stigmatizing indication, such as pregnancy. We conducted a study with three placebo-only MPT products in Kisumu, Kenya and Soshanguve, South Africa, to assess preferences for attributes of tablets, vaginal rings and injectable products for dual prevention of HIV and pregnancy (TRIO Study). Here, we present former TRIO participants’ views on the study results.

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Breaking the cycle of transmission: Finding new ways to reach young men with HIV services in South Africa

South Africa’s health data demonstrate that young men are less likely to test for HIV and less likely to start treatment when diagnosed as HIV-positive. Young men living with HIV often transmit the virus to younger female partners, contributing to an inter-generational cycle of transmission. Consequently, it is important to ensure men are fully incorporated into a holistic response in order to achieve epidemic control.

Author
Johanna Theunissen, Communications Officer, Technical Support to PEPFAR Programs, Baylor College of Medicine Children’s Foundation Malawi

'Management of a spoiled identity': systematic review of interventions to address self-stigma among people living with and affected by HIV

Self-stigma, also known as internalised stigma, is a global public health threat because it keeps people from accessing HIV and other health services. By hampering HIV testing, treatment and prevention, self-stigma can compromise the sustainability of health interventions and have serious epidemiological consequences. This review synthesised existing evidence of interventions aiming to reduce self-stigma experienced by people living with HIV and key populations affected by HIV in low-income and middle-income countries.
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It's When the Trees Blossom: Explanatory Beliefs, Stigma, and Mental Illness in the Context of HIV in Botswana

Mental illness is a common comorbidity of HIV and complicates treatment. In Botswana, stigma impedes treatment of mental illness. We examined explanatory beliefs about mental illness, stigma, and interactions between HIV and mental illness among 42 adults, from HIV clinic and community settings, via thematic analysis of interviews. Respondents endorse witchcraft as a predominant causal belief, in addition to drug abuse and effects of HIV.

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Violence, abuse and discrimination: Key factors militating against control of HIV/AIDS among the LGBTI sector

Author
Abaver, D. T. and E. N. Cishe

The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) South Africans continue to face considerable challenges, including societal stigma, homophobic violence (particularly corrective rape), and high rates of sexually transmitted diseases and infections (particularly Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/AIDS) even when discrimination based on sexual orientation was outlawed by South African's post-apartheid constitution.

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Global Partnership for Action to Eliminate All Forms of HIV-Related Stigma and Discrimination

Author
UNAIDS

Without addressing HIV-related stigma and discrimination, the world will not achieve the goal of ending AIDS as a public health threat by 2030.

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Bibliography on Syndemics of HIV, STIs, TB, Hepatitis, Mental Health and Psychosocial Issues and Substance Abuse Among Key Populations

Author
Clint Trout and Nana Sang-Bender

Introduction: Many studies have shown that key populations, including men who have sex with men, female sex workers, persons who inject drugs and transgender men and women face stigma, violence and discrimination as well as suffer from high rates of mental health/psychosocial issues and substance abuse. However, services to address these issues for key populations remain under resourced.

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Treating key and mobile populations as people, not public health problems

Of no surprise to those in the HIV field, the epidemic continues to be fueled by stigma, none more evident than among key and mobile populations, such as people who inject drugs and sex workers. Speakers at the Southern African HIV Clinicians Society conference shared their experiences in working with these groups and challenged participants to view them as people – and not merely a public health problem.  
Author
SHARE staff

The youth tipping point: opportunities and challenges

Looking at where we have come from, and where we are in southern Africa’s fight against HIV, it is clear that we have had some monumental successes and some incredible failures along the way, both of which we can learn from to do better. One clear theme throughout the first day of the 2nd International Workshop on HIV Adolescence: Challenges and Solutions was that we have not consistently and adequately gained the insights of the very people who are enrolled in studies to generate evidence on how to address the needs of these populations. Further, we have not committed the resources required to conduct the research on the populations that are difficult to reach, whether due to challenging ethical enrolment or stigma and criminalization of key populations.
Author
SHARE staff
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