rectal microbicides

Will Rectal Dreams Come True?

Venue
Webinar

Join Drs. Craig Hendrix (Johns Hopkins, Director of MTN’s Rectal Microbicide Program) and Alex Carballo-Dieguez (Columbia University) for this IRMA/AVAC webinar to learn about the latest biological, clinical, and behavioral data coming out of DREAM  (Development of a Rectal Enema as a Microbicide, a U19 project.) 

Craig and Alex will be sharing new, compelling data that continue to demonstrate the biological, clinical and behavioral viability of a douche (enema) used as an on-demand, sex-associated, behaviorally congruent microbicide. 

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Project Gel a Randomized Rectal Microbicide Safety and Acceptability Study in Young Men and Transgender Women

Is the resource available on the Internet?
Yes
Author
McGowan I, Cranston RD, Mayer KH, Febo I, Duffill K, Siegel A, et al.

The purpose of Project Gel was to determine the safety and acceptability of rectal microbicides in young men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TGW) at risk of HIV infection.

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Formulation and delivery of anti-HIV rectal microbicides: Advances and challenges

Is the resource available on the Internet?
Yes
Author
Rute Nunes, Bruno Sarmento, José das Neves

Men and women engaged in unprotected receptive anal intercourse (RAI) are at higher risk of acquiring HIV from infected partners. The implementation of preventive strategies is urgent and rectal microbicides may be a useful tool in reducing the sexual transmission of HIV. However, pre-clinical and first clinical trials have been able to identify limitations of candidate products, mostly related with safety issues, which can in turn enhance viral infection.

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Learning about additional HIV prevention methods doesn’t undermine gay men’s intentions to use condoms

Is the resource available on the Internet?
Yes
Author
Roger Pebody

Health promotion interventions can combine information about condoms and alternative biomedical prevention methods without undermining attitudes and intentions to use condoms, according to an experimental study published in the September issue of AIDS & Behavior.

“Our results are inconsistent with risk compensation theory, which posits that use of a biomedical prevention approach will lead to less positive attitudes, intentions, and use of condoms,” comment the authors.

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Spotlight on Prevention: An Update on Rectal Microbicide Research and Advocacy

Is the resource available on the Internet?
Yes
Author
AIDSTAR-One

Microbicides are compounds that are being tested for the prevention of HIV or other sexually transmitted infections. Unlike such strategies as condom use and abstinence, microbicides can be used independently of the sexual partner’s consent. Until recently, research has focused on vaginal microbicides; however, recent initiatives and ongoing studies highlight the importance of rectal microbicides as part of the HIV prevention toolkit.

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