rapid treatment initiation

Linking HIV-positive key population members to treatment: Burundi’s five secrets to success

The LINKAGES project first started working in Burundi in August 2016 to reduce HIV transmission among key populations and improve their enrollment and retention in care and treatment. Within the past three years, LINKAGES Burundi has consistently experienced high rates of linking newly diagnosed HIV-positive female sex workers, men who have sex with men, and transgender people to care and treatment. Between the first quarter of FY18 and the second quarter of FY19, the average rates for linkage to antiretroviral treatment were 98 percent among FSWs, 96 percent among MSM, and 100 percent among transgender people. This blog outlines the five “secrets” LINKAGES Burundi credits for their success.
Author
Aubrey Weber, Tiffany Lillie, Dorica Boyee and Dismas Gashobotse
Source
LINKAGES

Which HIV-infected adults with high CD4 T-cell counts benefit most from immediate initiation of antiretroviral therapy? A post-hoc subgroup analysis of the START trial

Is the resource available on the Internet?
Yes
Author
Jean-Michel Molina, Birgit Grund, Fred Gordin et al.

Background

Immediate initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in asymptomatic adults with CD4 counts higher than 500 cells per μL, as recommended, might not always be possible in resource-limited settings. We aimed to identify subgroups of individuals who would benefit most from immediate treatment.

Methods

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Guidelines for the managing advanced HIV disease and rapid initiation of antiretroviral therapy

Is the resource available on the Internet?
Yes
Author
World Health Organization

The objectives of these guidelines are to provide recommendations outlining a public health approach to managing people presenting with advanced HIV disease, and to provide guidance on the timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for all people living with HIV.

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Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2016)

Venue
Boston, USA

The Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) was established in 1993 to provide a forum for basic scientists and clinical investigators to present, discuss, and critique their investigations into the epidemiology and biology of human retroviruses and associated diseases. The synergy of basic science and clinical investigation has been a major contributor to the success of the meeting.

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