mental health

'I went back to being myself': Acceptability of a culturally adapted task-shifted cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) treatment for depression (Ziphamandla) for South African HIV care settings

There is a need for a culturally adapted, evidence-based, psychotherapy treatment that is effective, acceptable, and feasible for integration into primary care in South Africa. This qualitative study used exit interviews to examine participants' experiences of an adapted cognitive-behavioural therapy treatment for adherence and depression, task-shifted and delivered by nurses in two peri-urban HIV clinics near Cape Town.
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Assessing rates and contextual predictors of 5-year mortality among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals following HIV testing in Durban, South Africa

BACKGROUND: Little is known about contextual factors that predict long-term mortality following HIV testing in resource-limited settings. We evaluated the impact of contextual factors on 5-year mortality among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals in Durban, South Africa.

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Mental health in South African adolescents living with HIV: correlates of internalising and externalising symptoms

Although declining in all other age groups, AIDS-related deaths among adolescents are increasing. In the context of HIV, mental health problems are associated with negative health outcomes, including non-adherence to life-saving ART. For effective programming it is essential to identify factors associated with psychological outcomes in this population. Adopting a socioecological perspective, we aimed to identify correlates of internalising and externalising symptoms in a large, representative sample of South African adolescents living with HIV.
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Low prevalence of depressive symptoms among stable patients on antiretroviral therapy in Johannesburg, South Africa

Author
Kate Shearer, Denise Evans, Barbara Xhosa, Kamban Hirasen, Craig Bracken, Kay Mahomed, Lawrence Long, Matthew P. Fox
Depression is a leading cause of disability and may be associated with decreased adherence to ART. We sought to describe the prevalence of depressive symptoms and outcomes one year after screening among patients receiving ART at a large HIV Clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa.
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HIV-status disclosure and depression in the context of unintended pregnancy among South African women

Author
Brittain, K., et al.

Depressive symptoms are common among pregnant women living with HIV, and an unintended pregnancy may heighten vulnerability. HIV-status disclosure is thought to improve psychological well-being, but few quantitative studies have explored the relationships among disclosure, pregnancy intention and depression.

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“We are not defined by our status”: Addressing young people’s needs holistically

Young people living with HIV are not just a statistic, we are not defined by our status. There is more to us and to our needs than just our HIV status. This is one of the key messages that I hope gets amplified at the 2018 International AIDS Conference.

Taonga

Author
Diana Taonga Tembo Kennedy Training Fellow and Master Coach, Grassroot Soccer

Nurse led home-based care for people with HIV/AIDS

Is the resource available on the Internet?
Yes
Author
Elizabeth M. Wood, Babalwa Zani, Tonya M. Esterhuizen and Taryn Young

Home-based care is used in many countries to increase quality of life and limit hospital stay, particularly where public health services are overburdened. Home-based care objectives for HIV/AIDS can include medical care, delivery of antiretroviral treatment and psychosocial support. This review assesses the effects of home-based nursing on morbidity in people infected with HIV/AIDS.

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Laughter therapy as an intervention to promote psychological well-being of volunteer community care workers working with HIV-affected families

Is the resource available on the Internet?
Yes
Author
Irene Hatzipapas, Maretha J. Visser, and Estie Janse van Rensburg

The study explores the experiences of volunteer community care workers working with HIV-affected families, participating in laughter therapy. Laughter therapy is being used as an intervention to positively influence individuals experiencing various forms of emotional distress. Community care workers play a vital role in the support of the HIV/AIDS-infected and -affected members in communities. The nature of this type of work and their limited training contributes to high levels of secondary trauma and emotional exhaustion.

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