linkage to care

Simplified clinical algorithm for identifying patients eligible for same-day HIV treatment initiation (SLATE): Results from an individually randomized trial in South Africa and Kenya

The World Health Organization recommends "same-day" initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV patients who are eligible and ready. Identifying efficient, safe, and feasible procedures for determining same-day eligibility and readiness is now a priority. The Simplified Algorithm for Treatment Eligibility (SLATE) study evaluated a clinical algorithm that allows healthcare workers to determine eligibility for same-day treatment and to initiate ART at the patient’s first clinic visit.
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Re-thinking Linkage to Care in the Era of Universal Test and Treat: Insights from Implementation and Behavioral Science for Achieving the Second 90

To successfully link to care, persons living with HIV must negotiate a complex series of processes from HIV diagnosis through initial engagement with HIV care systems and providers. Despite the complexity involved, linkage to care is often oversimplified and portrayed as a single referral step. In this article, we offer a new conceptual framework for linkage to care, tailored to the current universal test and treat era that presents linkage to care as its own nuanced pathway within the larger HIV care cascade. Conceptualizing linkage to care in this way may help better identify and specify processes posing a barrier to linkage, and allow for the development of targeted implementation and behavioral science-based approaches to address them. Such approaches are likely to be most relevant to programmatic and clinical settings with limited resources and high HIV burden.
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Gender Norms and HIV Testing/Treatment Uptake: Evidence from a Large Population-Based Sample in South Africa

How does the endorsement of different dimensions of gender norms by men and/or women influence their use of HIV testing and antiretroviral treatment? This question was examined using data from a 2014 population-based survey of 1053 women and 1004 men, ages 18–49, in rural South Africa. We used a global measure for views toward gender norms (the GEM Scale), plus four subsets of scale items (all reliabilities ≥ 0.7).

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Project SOAR’s AIDS and Behavior special issue: Using implementation science to accelerate progress toward achieving the 90-90-90 goals

Since its inception, Project SOAR has conducted 70 activities in 21 countries. This supplement features findings from select activities that cover all three pillars of the project: research, research utilization, and capacity strengthening. The papers are organized by the following topics:

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Re-thinking Linkage to Care in the Era of Universal Test and Treat: Insights from Implementation and Behavioral Science for Achieving the Second 90

To successfully link to care, persons living with HIV must negotiate a complex series of processes from HIV diagnosis through initial engagement with HIV care systems and providers. Despite the complexity involved, linkage to care is often oversimplified and portrayed as a single referral step. In this article, we offer a new conceptual framework for linkage to care, tailored to the current universal test and treat era that presents linkage to care as its own nuanced pathway within the larger HIV care cascade.

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Linking HIV-positive key population members to treatment: Burundi’s five secrets to success

The LINKAGES project first started working in Burundi in August 2016 to reduce HIV transmission among key populations and improve their enrollment and retention in care and treatment. Within the past three years, LINKAGES Burundi has consistently experienced high rates of linking newly diagnosed HIV-positive female sex workers, men who have sex with men, and transgender people to care and treatment. Between the first quarter of FY18 and the second quarter of FY19, the average rates for linkage to antiretroviral treatment were 98 percent among FSWs, 96 percent among MSM, and 100 percent among transgender people. This blog outlines the five “secrets” LINKAGES Burundi credits for their success.
Author
Aubrey Weber, Tiffany Lillie, Dorica Boyee and Dismas Gashobotse
Source
LINKAGES

Breaking the cycle of transmission: Finding new ways to reach young men with HIV services in South Africa

South Africa’s health data demonstrate that young men are less likely to test for HIV and less likely to start treatment when diagnosed as HIV-positive. Young men living with HIV often transmit the virus to younger female partners, contributing to an inter-generational cycle of transmission. Consequently, it is important to ensure men are fully incorporated into a holistic response in order to achieve epidemic control.

Author
Johanna Theunissen, Communications Officer, Technical Support to PEPFAR Programs, Baylor College of Medicine Children’s Foundation Malawi
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