intimate partner violence (IPV)

Why interventions to prevent intimate partner violence and HIV have failed young women in southern Africa

Adolescent girls and young women aged 15 to 24 years have some of the highest HIV incidence rates globally, with girls two to four times more likely to be living with HIV than their male peers. High levels of intimate partner violence (IPV) experienced by this age group is a significant risk factor for HIV acquisition. While behavioural interventions to prevent IPV and HIV in southern Africa have seen some success in reducing self-reported experiences of IPV, these interventions have largely failed to achieve similar outcomes for young women.
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Depression among HIV positive pregnant women in Zimbabwe: a primary health care based cross-sectional study

Depression is a common psychiatric disorder that is highly prevalent among people living with HIV (PLWH). Depression is linked to poor adherence to anti-retroviral medication while in the peri-natal period may affect birth outcomes. Intimate partner violence (IPV) has been linked to depression. Little is known about the factors associated with depression in HIV positive pregnant women in Zimbabwe.
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Gender inequality and HIV

Author
Avert

Despite progress in many aspects of the global HIV response, women - particularly adolescent girls and young women - continue to be disproportionately affected by HIV. Women constitute more than half of all people living with HIV. AIDS-related illnesses remain the leading cause of death for women aged 30-49 and the third leading cause of death for women aged 15-29.

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Love, Power, and PrEP Webinar: Part One

Venue
Webinar

This two-part webinar series will share the findings from formative research (Part 1) and intervention research (Part 2) on the important topic of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), as presented by the Microbicide Product Introduction Initiative (MPii) at the HIV R4P conference satellite session.

Speakers

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The relationship between vaginal ring use and intimate partner violence and social harms: formative research outcomes from the CHARISMA study in Johannesburg, South Africa

Author
Hartmann, Miriam, Thesla Palanee-Phillips, Shannon O’Rourke, Konyin Adewumi, Siyanda Tenza, Florence Mathebula, Danielle Wagner, Asha Ayub, and Elizabeth T. Montgomery

Despite being designed for autonomous use, research suggests partner approval is often necessary in women's microbicide use. Microbicide study participants have described many ways product use affects relationships, from improving sexual pleasure to increasing harm, including exacerbating intimate partner violence (IPV). As the dapivirine ring proceeds closer to licensure, supporting women's agency to use microbicides safely is a priority.

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Photo story: CHARISMA - 'To empower women to be safe while using the vaginal ring'

Author
Tara Miller

This photo story, about implementing the CHARISMA intervention pilot in Johannesburg, South Africa, illustrates how the pilot unfolded, starting with CHARISMA lay counselors conducting relationship assessments in 2016 with women using the vaginal dapivirine ring for HIV prevention in the MTN-025 (HOPE) study.

CHARISMA integrated delivery of HIV prevention with relationship skills-building and intimate partner violence (IPV) counseling for women at the Wits Reproductive Health & HIV Institute (Wits RHI) in Johannesburg.

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Intimate partner violence, forced first sex and adverse pregnancy outcomes in a sample of Zimbabwean women accessing maternal and child health care

Author
Shamu S, Munjanja S, Zarowsky C, Shamu P, Temmerman M, Abrahams N

Intimate partner violence (IPV) remains a serious problem with a wide range of health consequences including poor maternal and newborn health outcomes. We assessed the relationship between IPV, forced first sex (FFS) and maternal and newborn health outcomes and concluded that strengthening primary and secondary violence prevention is required to improve pregnancy-related outcomes.

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Are we meeting the HIV service needs of people living in informal settlements in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa?

Is the resource available on the Internet?
Yes
Author
Project SOAR

Communities in South Africa’s informal settlements consist of ad-hoc and improvised housing whose residents seek opportunities for employment in the surrounding area. Since the settlements are unplanned, they are often underserved by municipal services, are under-represented politically, and lack accessible healthcare and economic opportunities. This can create an environment that increases residents’ risks for HIV and sexual and gender-based violence.

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