geospatial analysis

Priorities for Local AIDS Control Efforts (PLACE) Tool Kit

The Priorities for Local AIDS Control Efforts (PLACE) method aims to improve our understanding of the drivers of local HIV epidemics, identify gaps in services available to those most likely to acquire and transmit HIV, and provide evidence to support tailored interventions to reduce transmission. Achieving this goal is a challenge because many people don’t know they have the virus, making the local pattern of new infections almost impossible to detect.

Mapping HIV prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa between 2000 and 2017

HIV/AIDS is a leading cause of disease burden in sub-Saharan Africa. Existing evidence has demonstrated that there is substantial local variation in the prevalence of HIV; however, subnational variation has not been investigated at a high spatial resolution across the continent. Here we explore within-country variation at a 5 × 5-km resolution in sub-Saharan Africa by estimating the prevalence of HIV among adults (aged 15–49 years) and the corresponding number of people living with HIV from 2000 to 2017.

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Towards UNAIDS Fast-Track goals: targeting priority geographic areas for HIV prevention and care in Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe has made substantial progress towards the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) targets of 90-90-90 by 2020, with 73% of people living with HIV diagnosed, 87% of those diagnosed on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and 86% of those on ART virally suppressed. Despite this exceptional response, more effort is needed to completely achieve the UNAIDS targets. Here, we conducted a detailed spatial analysis of the geographical structure of the HIV epidemic in Zimbabwe to include geographical prioritization as a key component of their overall HIV intervention strategy.
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Spatial overlaps in the distribution of HIV/AIDS and malaria in Zimbabwe

Author
Gwitira I, Murwira A, Mberikunashe J, Masocha M
In most developing economies particularly in Africa, more people are likely to die of HIV/AIDS and malaria compared to other diseases. HIV/AIDS tends to be superimposed on the long standing malaria burden particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. The detection and understanding of spatial overlaps in disease occurrence is important for integrated and targeted disease control. Integrated disease control can enhance efficiency and cost-effectiveness through the development of drugs targeting multiple infections in the same geographic space.
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Demand for and Uses of Geospatial Mapping in HIV Programs: Documenting the Experiences of End-Users in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa

Is the resource available on the Internet?
Yes
Author
Nicole Judice and Anita Datar

Geospatial analysis of epidemiological and health service data can generate maps of hotspots—locations where HIV prevalence is concentrated—and existing medical and social services and infrastructure. Using this method of data visualization, program planners can easily determine where HIV resources and services are lacking and where they should be deployed to have the greatest impact.

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