childhood TB

Where is TB in maternal & child health?

Venue
Online

Why are some children unresponsive to adequate treatment for pneumonia, malnutrition, and HIV? Why do some of them die? Maybe they are among the over 600,000 children that fall ill with tuberculosis each year but are never diagnosed.

Join experts from the TB and MNCH communities in a global debate on the linkages between tuberculosis and maternal and child health to:

  • identify opportunities for intervention,

  • increase the visibility of childhood TB, and

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Strengthening guidelines for childhood tuberculosis to accelerate diagnosis and treatment

Is the resource available on the Internet?
Yes
Author
African Strategies for Health (ASH)

Tuberculosis (TB), now the leading infectious cause of death worldwide, is a key contributor to morbidity and mortality among children in Africa. While many countries in the continent have developed national strategies to address childhood TB, implementation of these strategies in practice lags. National guidelines for the management of childhood TB can strengthen health service delivery and improve diagnosis and treatment.

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Addressing Childhood Tuberculosis: Opportunities for Maternal and Child Survival Platforms

Is the resource available on the Internet?
Yes
Author
African Strategies for Health (ASH)

Tuberculosis (TB) is now the leading infectious cause of death worldwide – ahead of HIV. While major advances in the diagnosis and treatment of TB have been made since 1990, children suffering from this disease have remained neglected and vulnerable. An estimated 1 million children become ill with TB each year, and at least 400 children die each day from TB around the world.

Watch this video to learn about opportunities for tackling childhood TB.

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The policy and practice divide for childhood tuberculosis in Africa: A landscape analysis

Is the resource available on the Internet?
Yes
Author
African Strategies for Health (ASH)

The United States Agency for International Development’s (USAID) African Strategies for Health (ASH) project undertook this childhood TB landscape analysis, to expand and centralize available information on childhood TB in the African region.

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Ending a Global Epidemic of Tuberculosis in Children

“When my daughter got sick, I took her to a clinic in my neighborhood. They gave her cough syrup for seven days. I thought she was getting better, but it was apparent that she was still ill. After another examination, they referred her to St. Paul Hospital in Addis Ababa where they put her on oxygen and started taking blood sample after sample and injection after injection for a month. Her condition did not get better so they gave her another medicine. The doctors then decided to take blood from her back…only then did they know it was tuberculosis.”  Atsede Tefera

Author
Keri Lijinsky
Source
USAID

The first tuberculosis drug for children arrives this month!

After "pharma-bro" Martin Shkreli hiked drugs prices to ridiculous amounts last year, it’s nice to hear about a positive step forward in the pharmaceutical market. And here it is: A team effort from the World Health Organization, TB Alliance, and the US government has created a Tuberculosis (TB) for children in developing countries.

Author
Meghan Werft
Source
Global Citizen

Childhood TB for Healthcare Workers

Childhood TB for Healthcare Workers is a course that can be completed entirely online and at your own pace. It covers how to diagnose, treat and prevent childhood TB, including how to perform contact screening. The course is interactive and will ask you to make decisions about fictional cases in different settings.

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