barriers to disclosure

The rebellious man: Next-of-kin accounts of the death of a male relative on antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa

The HIV response is hampered by many obstacles to progression along the HIV care cascade, with men, in particular, experiencing different forms of disruption. One group of men, whose stories remain untold, are those who have succumbed to HIV-related illness. In this paper, we explore how next-of-kin account for the death of a male relative.
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The context and process of pediatric HIV disclosure

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Yes
Author
Angela Odiachi

When a child is living with HIV, many issues surround disclosure, such as: Who should disclose to the child? Where should disclosure take place? At what age should the child be disclosed? While guidance exists on what should be done, this study looked at the actual practice of disclosure with 34 caregivers of children living with HIV in Nigeria to better understand the impetus, the process, the context and the people involved in disclosure with the child.

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I Can't Change My HIV Status But You Can Change Your Attitude Campaign

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Yes
Author
SANAC

Launched on December 1 2014, this national campaign is mobilising South Africans to engage in dialogue and debate around social attitudes towards people living with HIV (PLWHV), while encouraging greater openness and disclosure by PLWHV about their status. Themed 'I Can't Change My HIV Status But You Can Change Your Attitude, Zero Stigma, Zero Discrimination', the campaign is using personal testimonies to engage people in dialogue to ultimately eliminate stigma and discrimination.

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Of guidelines, targets and resources: the documents that defined the 2014 International AIDS Conference

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Yes
Author
Gus Cairns

If there was a phrase that defined the 20th International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2014), one that surfaced in every few presentations and kept turning up in documents, it was “key affected populations”.

The World Health Organization (WHO) actually released its new Consolidated guidelines on HIV prevention, diagnosis, treatment and care for key populations on 11 July, nine days before the conference started.

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