antiretroviral drugs

Long‐term virologic responses to antiretroviral therapy among HIV‐positive patients entering adherence clubs in Khayelitsha, Cape Town, South Africa: a longitudinal analysis

Introduction
In South Africa, an estimated 4.6 million people were accessing antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 2018. As universal Test and Treat is implemented, these numbers will continue to increase. Given the need for lifelong care for millions of individuals, differentiated service delivery models for ART services such as adherence clubs (ACs) for stable patients are required. In this study, we describe long‐term virologic outcomes of patients who have ever entered ACs in Khayelitsha, Cape Town.

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Growth in HIV-1-exposed but uninfected infants treated with lopinavir-ritonavir versus lamivudine: a secondary analysis of the ANRS 12174 trial

The tolerance of antiretroviral drugs in infants must be carefully evaluated. In previous studies of children with HIV type 1 (HIV-1) less weight gain was observed in children given lopinavir-ritonavir-based combinations than those given nevirapine. We aimed to compare the effects of lopinavir-ritonavir and lamivudine on growth in HIV-exposed uninfected infants included in the ANRS 12174 trial.
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Physicians cured a man of HIV. But that’s not our best shot at fighting AIDS.

When I began caring for people with HIV in the early 1980s, the disease was usually a death sentence. We had no drugs to fight the virus, and most of our patients died within months to a year. It wasn’t until 1996 that a combination of drugs known as the “anti-HIV cocktail” was able to suppress the virus and improve patients’ health. So it was noteworthy when at a major AIDS meeting in Seattle this month, researchers made the announcement: For the second time in history, a man had been cured of HIV.

Author
Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health
Source
The Washington Post

Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2019)

Venue
Seattle, Washington, USA

The annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) brings together top basic, translational, and clinical researchers from around the world to share the latest studies, important developments, and best research methods in the ongoing battle against HIV/AIDS and related infectious diseases. CROI 2019 will be held from March 4 to March 7, 2019, at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle, Washington.

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4th Southern African HIV Clinicians Society Conference

The Southern African HIV Clinicians Society’s biannual conference, held in Johannesburg, South Africa, from 24-27 October 2018, focused on clinical content for HIV and TB health care workers in the region and featured a wide range of topics, from new antiretroviral drugs, AIDS-related complications, and opportunistic infections, to promoting adherence and ethical issues.

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HIV New Product Introduction Toolkit

The HIV New Product Introduction Toolkit provides Ministries of Health (MoHs) and implementing partners with the tools necessary to evaluate the adoption and introduction of new products in their local context. The toolkit includes a wide-range of information, tools, and resources spanning the entire chain of product introduction including product adoption, forecasting, procurement, facility phase-in, and supply planning and monitoring, ensuring that products reach those in need of them. 

HIV New Product Introduction Guide: A framework for supporting new product introduction in national health systems

Author
Clinton Health Access Initiative

Over the past two decades, the landscape of medications used to treat HIV has evolved rapidly. Treatment options have improved dramatically with the development and availability of more efficacious, safer, and more tolerable antiretrovirals (ARVs). These options allow national treatment programs to better serve the needs of their patients, support significant treatment scale-up, reduce costs, and achieve public health goals. Use of the most optimal regimens and products offers many benefits to national HIV programs and people living with HIV (PLHIV).

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