access to health care

Knowledge, risk perception and access to healthcare services for HIV and tuberculosis among university students in Johannesburg, South Africa

Author
D Evans, N Musakwa, C Nattey, J Bor, E Lonnermark, C Larshans, S Andreasson, P Nyasulu, L Long
An increasingly diverse body of students is entering university in South Africa. HIV and tuberculosis (TB) are pressing health issues for this vulnerable population and the university campus offers an opportunity to intervene with health promotion activities. This study describes knowledge and risk perception of TB and HIV among high school leavers entering tertiary education.
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Women's (health) work: A population-based, cross-sectional study of gender differences in time spent seeking health care in Malawi

Author
Yeatman, S. Chamberlin, S. Dovel, K.
There has been a notable expansion in routine health care in sub-Saharan Africa. While heath care is nominally free in many contexts, the time required to access services reflects an opportunity cost that may be substantial and highly gendered, reflecting the gendered nature of health care guidelines and patterns of use. The time costs of health care use, however, have rarely been systematically assessed at the population-level.
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Zero Discrimination Day 2018 Brochure

Is the resource available on the Internet?
Yes
Author
UNAIDS

Zero Discrimination Day is a commemorated each year across the globe on 1 March. This year, UNAIDS highlighted the right of everyone to be free from discrimination. No one should ever be discriminated against because of their age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, disability, race, ethnicity, language, health (including HIV) status, geographical location, economic status or migrant status, or for any other reason. Unfortunately, however, discrimination continues to undermine efforts to achieve a more just and equitable world.

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Zero Discrimination Day 2018

Venue
Global

On Zero Discrimination Day, UNAIDS is highlighting the right of everyone to be free from discrimination. No one should ever be discriminated against because of their age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, disability, race, ethnicity, language, health (including HIV) status, geographical location, economic status or migrant status, or for any other reason. Unfortunately, however, discrimination continues to undermine efforts to achieve a more just and equitable world. Many people face discrimination every day based on who they are or what they do.

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Barriers and facilitators to the uptake of tuberculosis diagnostic and treatment services by hard-to-reach populations in countries of low and medium tuberculosis incidence: a systematic review of qualitative literature

Is the resource available on the Internet?
Yes
Author
de Vries, Sophia G et al.

Tuberculosis disproportionately affects hard-to-reach populations, such as homeless people, migrants, refugees, prisoners, or drug users. These people often face challenges in accessing quality health care. We did a systematic review of the qualitative literature to identify barriers and facilitators to the uptake of tuberculosis diagnostic and treatment services by people from hard-to-reach populations in all European Union (EU), European Economic Area, EU candidate, and Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries.

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Zero Discrimination Day 2017

Venue
Global

This year we are calling on everyone to make some noise for #zerodiscrimination. Individuals and communities can join voices and transform the world. Zero Discrimination Day is an opportunity to highlight how everyone can be part of the transformation and take a stand for a fair and just society.

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Meeting Africa’s universal health challenge

The right to health is a basic human right, one that depends on access to timely and affordable health care of appropriate quality. Yet, we know that approximately 100 million people globally are needlessly pushed into poverty every year as a result of costly health care expenditure.

Nobody should be forced to choose between seeking medical care and staying out of poverty. It is unacceptable that families, sometimes whole communities, are denied life-saving health services and forced to pay unaffordable fees for their care.

Author
Graça Machel and Ricardo Lagos
Source
THISDAY
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