Zero Discrimination Day 2018 Brochure

UNAIDS

Zero Discrimination Day is a commemorated each year across the globe on 1 March. This year, UNAIDS highlighted the right of everyone to be free from discrimination. No one should ever be discriminated against because of their age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, disability, race, ethnicity, language, health (including HIV) status, geographical location, economic status or migrant status, or for any other reason. Unfortunately, however, discrimination continues to undermine efforts to achieve a more just and equitable world. Many people face discrimination every day based on who they are or what they do. Discrimination will not disappear without actively addressing the ignorance, practices and beliefs that fuel it. Ending discrimination requires action from everyone. Zero Discrimination Day is an opportunity to highlight how everyone can be a part of the transformation and take a stand towards a more fair and just society.

This year’s Zero Discrimination Day campaign invited people to ask themselves “What if …” and to reflect upon their own actions. Download the campaign brochure here.

 
March 9, 2018
Year of publication
2018
Resource types
Tools
Tags
stigma, discrimination, Zero Discrimination Day, access to health services, human rights, access to health care

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