Young women’s perceptions of transactional sex and sexual agency: a qualitative study in the context of rural South Africa

Meghna Ranganathan, Catherine MacPhail, Audrey Pettifor, Kathleen Kahn, Nomhle Khoza, Rhian Twine, Charlotte Watts and Lori Heise

Evidence shows that HIV prevalence among young women in sub-Saharan Africa increases almost five-fold between ages 15 and 24, with almost a quarter of young women infected by their early-to mid-20s. Transactional sex or material exchange for sex is a relationship dynamic that has been shown to have an association with HIV infection.

September 11, 2017
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Countries
Tags
young women, South Africa, HIV prevalence, transactional sex, risk factors

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