Willingness to Pay for Condoms in Five Countries

Ganesan, Ramakrishnan, Jordan Tuchman, and Lauren Hartel

Though condom use is now higher than ever before, key gaps remain in countries and in certain populations, where use has stagnated or even decreased. To address these gaps, UNFPA in 2016 spearheaded the creation of the “20 by 20 Initiative,” a multisectoral effort to increase the number of condoms in low-and middle-income countries to 20 billion by 2020. To support this initiative, AIDSFree conducted surveys to assess consumers’ willingness to pay for male condoms in five sub-Saharan countries—Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

October 15, 2018
Year of publication
2018
Resource types
Briefs, Journal and research articles
Tags
20 by 20 Initiative, condoms, condom use, Kenya, Nigeria, HIV prevention

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