Why don’t urban youth in Zambia use condoms? The influence of gender and marriage on non-use of male condoms among young adults

Pinchoff, Jessie; Boyer, Christopher; Mutombo, Namuunda; Chowdhuri, Rachna Nag; Ngo, Thoai

Zambia experiences high unmet need for family planning and high rates of HIV, particularly among youth. While male condoms are widely available and 95% of adults have heard of them, self-reported use in the past 12 months is low among young adults (45%). This study describes factors associated with non-use of male condoms among urban young adults in Zambia. 

March 17, 2017
Year of publication
2017
Countries
Tags
Zambia, youth, unmet need for family planning, HIV, family planning, male condoms, condom use, young adults, urban youth, contraception, dual protection, HIV prevention, key populations

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