The WHO public health approach to HIV treatment and care: looking back and looking ahead

Nathan Ford, Andrew Ball, Rachel Baggaley, Marco Vitoria, Daniel Low-Beer, Martina Penazzato, Lara Vojnov, Silvia Bertagnolio, Vincent Habiyambere, Meg Doherty, Gottfried Hirnschall

In 2006, WHO set forth its vision for a public health approach to delivering antiretroviral therapy. This approach has been broadly adopted in resource-poor settings and has provided the foundation for scaling up treatment to over 19·5 million people. There is a global commitment to end the AIDS epidemic as a public health threat by 2030 and, to support this goal, there are opportunities to adapt the public health approach to meet the ensuing challenges. These challenges include the need to improve identification of people with HIV infection through expanded approaches to testing; further simplify and improve treatment and laboratory monitoring; adapt the public health approach to concentrated epidemics; and link HIV testing, treatment, and care to HIV prevention. Implementation of these key public health principles will bring countries closer to the goals of controlling the HIV epidemic and providing universal health coverage.

November 2, 2017
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Tags
WHO, public health, antiretroviral therapy (ART), ART delivery, treatment scale-up, public health approaches, linkage to care, HIV prevention, universal health coverage

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