WHO implementation tool for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) of HIV infection - MODULE 1: Clinical

World Health Organization

Following the WHO recommendation in September 2015 that “oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) should be offered as an additional prevention choice for people at substantial risk of HIV infection as part of combination HIV prevention approaches”, partners in countries expressed the need for practical advice on how to consider the introduction of PrEP and start implementation.

In response, WHO has developed this series of modules to support the implementation of PrEP among a range of populations in different settings.

Module 1: clinical

This module is for clinicians, including physicians, nurses and clinical officers. It gives an overview of how to provide PrEP safely and effectively, including: screening for substantial risk of HIV; performing appropriate testing before initiating someone on PrEP and while the person is taking PrEP; and how to follow up PrEP users and offer counselling on issues such as adherence.

All other modules can be found here.

August 24, 2017
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Programmatic guidance, Tools
Tags
WHO guidelines, oral PrEP, HIV prevention, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), combination HIV prevention approaches, PrEP implementation, clinicians, clinical settings, health care workers, adherence, HIV testing and counseling (HTC), physicians, nurses, clinical officers

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