WHO Fact Sheet: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs)

WHO

More than 30 different bacteria, viruses and parasites are known to be transmitted through sexual contact. Eight of these pathogens are linked to the greatest incidence of sexually transmitted disease. Of these 8 infections, 4 are currently curable: syphilis, gonorrhoea, chlamydia and trichomoniasis. The other 4 are viral infections and are incurable: hepatitis B, herpes simplex virus (HSV or herpes), HIV, and human papillomavirus (HPV). Symptoms or disease due to the incurable viral infections can be reduced or modified through treatment.

Read this comprehensive updated WHO Fact Sheet for more info.

September 5, 2016
Year of publication
2016
Resource types
Guidelines and Policies
Tags
sexually transmitted infections (STIs), STIs, syphilis, gonorrhoea, chlamydia, gonorrhea, trichomoniasis, herpes, HSV, HIV, human papillomavirus (HPV), HPV

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