Which men stand to benefit most from access to PrEP?

Michael Carter

New data from the PROUD pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) study have identified the characteristics of the gay and other men who have sex men (MSM) who are most likely to benefit from PrEP. Study participants were randomised to receive immediate or deferred PrEP. Analysis of the baseline sexual characteristics of men in the deferred arm who became infected with HIV showed that a rectal sexually transmitted infection (STI) and reporting recent unprotected anal sex with two or more partners were associated with especially high HIV incidence rates. Findings were reported to the recent conference of the British HIV Association (BHIVA) in Manchester.

May 5, 2016
Year of publication
2016
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Tags
HIV prevention, PrEP, men who have sex with men (MSM), pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), PROUD study

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