When are declines in condom use while using PrEP a concern? Modelling insights from a Hillbrow, South Africa case study

Hannah Grant, Zindoga Mukandavire, Robyn Eakle, Holly Prudden, Gabriela B Gomez, Helen Rees, Charlotte Watts

Oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a promising new prevention approach for those most at risk of HIV infection. However, there are concerns that behavioural disinhibition, specifically reductions in condom use, might limit PrEP's protective effect. This study uses the case of female sex workers (FSWs) in Johannesburg, South Africa, to assess whether decreased levels of condom use following the introduction of PrEP may limit HIV risk reduction.

October 31, 2017
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Case studies and success stories, Journal and research articles
Countries
Tags
pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), oral PrEP, HIV prevention, female sex workers, South Africa, condom use, risk reduction

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