The virological durability of first-line ART among HIV-positive adult patients in resource limited settings without virological monitoring: a retrospective analysis of DART trial data

David I. Dolling, Ruth L. Goodall, Michael Chirara, James Hakim, Peter Nkurunziza, Paula Munderi, David Eram, Dinah Tumukunde, Moira J. Spyer, Charles F. Gilks, Pontiano Kaleebu, David T. Dunn, Deenan Pillay

Few low-income countries have virological monitoring widely available. We estimated the virological durability of first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) after five years of follow-up among adult Ugandan and Zimbabwean patients in the DART study, in which virological assays were conducted retrospectively.

April 3, 2017
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Countries
Tags
virological monitoring, first-line ART, Uganda, Zimbabwe, DART study, virological assays, virological suppression, viral load monitoring, resource-limited settings

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