Video: “I deserve respect for my work as a sex worker”

Adella Mbabazi

Christine Namutebi, 21, lost her parents at the age of five, and was not able to stay in school. At the age of 18, she moved to Kampala, Uganda and started selling sex.

She is now a peer educator and supports other young women like her, who work on the street. Watch Christine’s story and find out how she learned to negotiate for safer sex through the support of the Uganda Link Up project.

March 23, 2016
Year of publication
2016
Resource types
Video and audio clips
Tags
sex work, sex workers, key populations, Uganda, peer education

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