The Vancouver Consensus: antiretroviral medicines, medical evidence, and political will

Chris Beyrer, Deborah L Birx, Linda-Gail Bekker, Françoise Barré-Sinoussi, Pedro Cahn, Mark R Dybul, Serge P Eholié, Matthew M Kavanagh, Elly T Katabira, Jens D Lundgren, Lilian Mworeko, Marama Pala, Thanyawee Puttanakit, Owen Ryan, Michel Sidibé, Julio S

In 1996, the global HIV community gathered in Vancouver, Canada, for the XI International AIDS Conference and shared the clear evidence that triple-combination antiretroviral treatment held the power to stem the tide of deaths from AIDS. The HIV treatment era had begun. As we gathered again in Vancouver in July, 2015, it was clear that a new transformative moment is upon us. The Vancouver Consensus statement, which emerged at the recently concluded 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2015), signals the scientific affirmation that, rather than limiting access to those who are immune compromised, immediate access to antiretroviral medicines holds the power to rapidly advance the fight to end AIDS.

August 11, 2015
Year of publication
2015
Tags
access to treatment, treatment, HIV, ART, ARVs, antiretroviral therapy, antiretroviral drugs, IAS 2015, Vancouver Consensus Statement, Global Fund, UNAIDS, PEPFAR, HIV prevention, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), PrEP, HIV response

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