Uptake of Home-Based HIV Testing, Linkage to Care, and Community Attitudes about ART in Rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: Descriptive Results from the First Phase of the ANRS 12249 TasP Cluster-Randomised Trial

Collins C. Iwuji, Joanna Orne-Gliemann, Joseph Larmarange, Nonhlanhla Okesola, Frank Tanser, Rodolphe Thiebaut, Claire Rekacewicz, Marie-Louise Newell, Francois Dabis

The 2015 WHO recommendation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for all immediately following HIV diagnosis is partially based on the anticipated impact on HIV incidence in the surrounding population. We investigated this approach in a cluster-randomised trial in a high HIV prevalence setting in rural KwaZulu-Natal. We present findings from the first phase of the trial and report on uptake of home-based HIV testing, linkage to care, uptake of ART, and community attitudes about ART.

August 16, 2016
Year of publication
2016
Resource types
Journal and research articles, Reports and Fact sheets
Countries
Tags
WHO recommendations, 2015 WHO guidelines, antiretroviral therapy, antiretroviral drugs, treatment, ART, ARVs, HIV prevalence rates, home-based HIV testing, linkage to care, uptake of ART, community attitudes, South Africa

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Objectives

To examine the association between testing in the 2010 HIV Testing and Counselling (HCT) campaign with HIV risk behaviours and enrolment on ART.

Study design

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