Updated recommendations on first-line and second-line antiretroviral regimens and post-exposure prophylaxis and recommendations on early infant diagnosis of HIV: interim guidance

World Health Organization

Update on antiretroviral regimens for treating and preventing HIV infection: Since 2016, WHO has recommended tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) + lamivudine (3TC) (or emtricitabine, FTC) + efavirenz (EFV) 600 mg as the preferred first- line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen for adults and adolescents. WHO recommended dolutegravir (DTG) as an alternative option to EFV for first-line ART because of the uncertainty regarding the safety and efficacy of DTG during pregnancy and among people living with HIV receiving rifampicin-based tuberculosis (TB) treatment. New WHO interim guidelines contain recommendations regarding preferred first-line regimens for adults, adolescents and children initiating ART, which now include DTG and RAL.

Update on early infant diagnosis of HIV: In 2016, WHO recommended that HIV virological testing be used to diagnose HIV infection among infants and children younger than 18 months and that ART be started without delay while a second specimen is collected to confirm the initial positive virological test result.

October 26, 2018
Year of publication
2018
Resource types
Guidelines and Policies
Tags
WHO guidelines, antiretroviral regimens, antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV treatment, first-line HIV treatment, dolutegravir, pregnancy, first-line ART, HIV-TB co-infection, tuberculosis, TB, treatment guidelines, early infant diagnosis (EID), virological testing

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