Time to implement 9-month infant HIV testing in South Africa

Fairlie L, Madevu-Matson CA, Black V, Sherman GG

BACKGROUND:

South Africa (SA) is likely to meet the National Strategic Plan target of

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of substituting this recommendation for the post-weaning HIV testing recommended by SA guidelines. 

METHODS: Rates of seroreversion and probability of infection at 9 months of age were applied to a theoretical population of 100 HIV-exposed infants, uninfected at birth and breastfed for 1 year with antiretroviral prophylaxis. Nine scenarios were developed and the number of HIV PCRs saved compared with current guidelines was calculated. 

RESULTS: Nine-month testing using the HRT reduced the number of follow-up PCR tests done in all scenarios by >50%, with differences ranging from 51% to 59% and 81% to 89% for low and high seroreversion rates, respectively. 

CONCLUSIONS: Nine-month testing using HRT would increase identification and early treatment of HIV-infected infants, improve monitoring of postnatal transmission rates, and reduce the number of HIV PCR tests done with resultant cost saving. Training of healthcare workers implementing HRT would be required. Ongoing efforts to improve implementation and monitoring of testing at 9 and 18 months will be essential.

October 12, 2015
Year of publication
2015
Resource types
Journal and research articles, Reports and Fact sheets
Tags
South Africa, PMTCT, mother-to-child transmission (MTCT), prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT), HIV rapid test (HRT), HIV-exposed infants, seroreversion, early detection

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