Teen Talk: A Guide for Positive Living

The sub-Saharan Africa edition of Teen Talk, a question and answer guide for HIV-positive adolescents, was adapted from the Botswana version, published in 2010 by the Botswana-Baylor Children's Clinical Centre of Excellence Teen Club Program, and the original version, which was published in the United States in 2004.

Teen Talk covers a variety of topics, including ARVs, adherence, friendship, nutrition, exercise, reproductive health, positive prevention, multiple concurrent partnerships, safe male circumcision, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, emotions, and disclosure.

July 31, 2013
Year of publication
2013
Tags
youth, OVC, USAID, PEPFAR, aidstar-one, children, adherence, orphans, vulnerable youth, child health, toolkits, sex education, disclosure, positive health

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