Technical Guide: Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission Of HIV in Prisons

UNITED NATIONS OFFICE ON DRUGS AND CRIME

The rise in the global female prison population, women’s unique vulnerabilities to HIV infection and insufficient provision and inequitable access to HIV services places the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) in prisons high on the agenda of HIV prevention among key populations.

In May 2017, the twenty-sixth session of the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice held in Vienna adopted resolution 26/2 “Ensuring access to measures for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in prisons”. [13] This technical guide has been developed in response to the Commission’s resolution 26/2, and is based on international guidelines, in particular World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines relevant to PMTCT.

This technical guide is intended to support countries in their efforts to increase their capacity to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV in prison, and achieve the ultimate goal of ending AIDS as a public health threat by 2030, “leaving no one behind”.

May 18, 2020
Year of publication
2020
Resource types
Toolkits
Tags
prisoners living with HIV, mother to child transmission

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