TALKING HIV: Being young and positive (audio)

Avert

In the second instalment of our new series – Talking HIV – we hear from Jimmy and Favour from Malawi. Jimmy and Favour are both 19 and living with HIV. We hear them talk about what it’s really like being young and positive, their personal struggles and how they got through them.

August 24, 2018
Year of publication
2018
Resource types
Video and audio clips
Countries
Tags
young people, young people living with HIV (YPLHIV), youth, adolescents, adolescents living with HIV

Similar Resources

Worldwide, a large proportion of all new HIV infections occur in people under age 25. AIDS is currently the leading cause of death among adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa and the second leading cause of death globally.

The Accelerating Children’s HIV/AIDS Treatment (ACT) Initiative was a public-private partnership that expanded pediatric HIV services in nine sub-Saharan African countries from 2014-2016, providing treatment to more than 560,000 children living with HIV.

USAID and PEPFAR's approach to pursuing HIV epidemic control is transforming lives and supporting the development of healthy, self-reliant Malawian people.

With new prevention strategies on the horizon and HIV incidence stabilizing or declining in many parts of the world, the tides are beginning to turn on the HIV epidemic. Between 2002 and 2010, new HIV infections globally declined from 3.1 million to 2.7 million.

The life expectancy of HIV-positive individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) is approaching that of HIV-negative people. However, little is known about how these populations compare in terms of health-related quality of life (HRQoL).

The sub-Saharan Africa edition of Teen Talk, a question and answer guide for HIV-positive adolescents, was adapted from the Botswana version, published in 2010 by the Botswana-Baylor Children's Clinical Centre of Excellence Teen Club Program, and the original version,…

Despite global reductions in AIDS-related deaths among adults, the rate for children increased by 50 percent. This increase points to inadequate testing, counselling, and treatment coverage and poor retention in services for these children.

Sub-Saharan Africa bears more than two-thirds of the worldwide burden of HIV; however, data among transgender women from the region are sparse. Transgender women across the world face significant vulnerability to HIV.

In late 2015, the Linkages Across the Continuum of HIV Services for Key Populations (LINKAGES) project established a global acceleration initiative to fast-track and strengthen delivery of a comprehensive package of health services for key populations (KPs) at scale. In this context, “…