A Systematic Review of Interventions to Reduce Maternal Mortality among HIV-Infected Pregnant and Postpartum Women

Sara A Holtz, Rudi Thetard, Sarah N Konopka, Jennifer Albertini, Anouk Amzel, Karen P Fogg

In high-prevalence populations, HIV-related maternal mortality is high with increased mortality found among HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women compared to their uninfected peers. The scale-up of HIV-related treatment options and broader reach of programming for HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women is likely to have decreased maternal mortality. This systematic review synthesized evidence on interventions that have directly reduced mortality among this population.

April 5, 2016
Year of publication
2015
Resource types
Journal and research articles, Literature review
Tags
HIV-related maternal mortality, HIV, pregnancy, HIV-positive pregnant women, treatment, maternal mortaility, ARVs, antiretroviral therapy, ART, antiretroviral drugs, postpartum women

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