Should HIV testing for all pregnant women continue? Cost-effectiveness of universal antenatal testing compared to focused approaches across high to very low HIV prevalence settings

Ishikawa, N., Dalal, S., Johnson, C., et al.

HIV testing is the entry point for the elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Decreasing external funding for the HIV response in some low- and middle-income countries has triggered the question of whether a focused approach to HIV testing targeting pregnant women in high-burden areas should be considered. This study aimed at determining and comparing the cost-effectiveness of universal and focused HIV testing approaches for pregnant women across high to very low HIV prevalence settings.

We conducted a modelling analysis on health and cost outcomes of HIV testing for pregnant women using four country-based case scenarios (Namibia, Kenya, Haiti and Viet Nam) to illustrate high, intermediate, low and very low HIV prevalence settings. 

February 27, 2017
Year of publication
2016
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Countries
Tags
elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (eMTCT), EMTCT, HIV testing, pregnant women, targeted testing, universal testing, cost-effectiveness, universal antenatal testing, Namibia, Kenya, Haiti, Viet Nam, PMTCT, prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT)

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Across sub-Saharan Africa, prevention of mother-to-child transmission services are encountering increasing numbers of women already established on antiretroviral therapy (ART) when entering antenatal care.