Severe adverse events during second-line tuberculosis treatment in the context of high HIV co-infection in South Africa: a retrospective cohort study

Kathryn Schnippel, Rebecca H. Berhanu, Andrew Black, Cynthia Firnhaber, Norah Maitisa, Denise Evans and Edina Sinanovic

According to the World Health Organization, South Africa ranks as one of the highest burden of TB, TB/HIV co-infection, and drug-resistant TB (DR-TB) countries. DR-TB treatment is complicated to administer and relies on the use of multiple toxic drugs, with potential for severe adverse drug reactions. We report the occurrence of adverse events (AEs) during a standardised DR-TB treatment regimen at two outpatient, decentralized, public-sector sites in Johannesburg, South Africa.

October 25, 2016
Year of publication
2016
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Countries
Tags
adverse events, second-line therapy, South Africa, co-infection, HIV-TB co-infection, drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB), adverse drug reactions, treatment, TB, tuberculosis

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