School-based interventions for preventing HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and pregnancy in adolescents

Mason-Jones AJ, Sinclair D, Mathews C, Kagee A, Hillman A, Lombard C

Cochrane researchers conducted a review of the effects of school-based interventions for reducing HIV, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and pregnancy in adolescents. After searching for relevant trials up to 7 April 2016, they included eight trials that had enrolled 55,157 adolescents.

November 28, 2016
Year of publication
2016
Resource types
Journal and research articles, Literature review, Systematic reviews
Tags
school-based interventions, HIV prevention, HIV reduction, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), early and unintended pregnancy, adolescent programming, adolescent pregnancy, sexual and reproductive health (SRH), comprehensive sexuality education (CSE), incentive-based interventions

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