Scaling a waterfall: a meta-ethnography of adolescent progression through the stages of HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa

Williams S, Renju J, Ghilardi L, Wringe A

Observational studies have shown considerable attrition among adolescents living with HIV across the "cascade" of HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa, leading to higher mortality rates compared to HIV-infected adults or children. We synthesized evidence from qualitative studies on factors that promote or undermine engagement with HIV services among adolescents living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa.

October 23, 2017
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Systematic reviews
Tags
cascade of care, HIV cascade, adolescents living with HIV, adolescents, attrition, adherence, mortality rates, patient engagement, psychosocial barriers, retention in care, stigma, HIV care engagement, linkage to care, treatment, antiretroviral therapy (ART)

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