Reducing clinic visits can support retention in HIV care, African studies show

Keith Alcorn

Interventions which reduce the need for people to attend clinics are proving highly successful in retaining people in care and supporting adherence to HIV medication in southern Africa, the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) heard last week.

Measures to reduce the burden of people seeking health care are also critical to improving the capacity of health systems to manage growing numbers of patients, numerous presenters at the conference confirmed. The new wave of interventions – described as 'differentiated care' in guidelines – are intended to reduce clinic visits, waiting times and monitoring requirements.

August 23, 2016
Year of publication
2016
Resource types
Conference materials, Journal and research articles
Tags
clinic visits, retention in care, AIDS 2016, 21st International AIDS Conference, differentiated care, clinic-based services

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