A public health and rights approach to drugs

UNAIDS

UNAIDS welcomes the stronger health and rights approach that is emerging in current drug control debates in the context of the 2016 UNGASS on the World Drug Problem. This trend needs to be translated into concrete operational and measurable commitments by Member States.

January 5, 2016
Year of publication
2015
Resource types
Guidelines and Policies
Tags
UNAIDS, drug control, public health

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