Prevention Access Campaign

Prevention Access Campaign

The Prevention Access Campaign is a health equity initiative to end the dual epidemics of HIV and HIV-related stigma by empowering people with and vulnerable to HIV with accurate and meaningful information about their social, sexual, and reproductive health.

Prevention Access Campaign's Undetectable = Untransmittable (U=U) is a growing global community of HIV advocates, activists, researchers, and over 525 Community Partners from 70 countries uniting to clarify and disseminate the revolutionary but largely unknown fact that people living with HIV on effective treatment do not sexually transmit HIV.  

U=U was launched in early 2016 by a group of people living with HIV who created a groundbreaking Consensus Statement with global experts to clear up confusion about the science of U=U. That Statement was the genesis of the U=U movement that is changing the definition of what it means to live with HIV. The movement is sharing the message to dismantle HIV stigma, improve the lives of people living with HIV, and bring us closer to ending the epidemic.

February 19, 2018
Year of publication
2018
Resource types
Websites or databases
Tags
Prevention Access Campaign, health equity, sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), Undetectable = Untransmittable (U=U), stigma and discrimination

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