Prevalence and predictors of late presentation for HIV care in South Africa

Fomundam HN, Tesfay AR, Mushipe SA, Mosina MB, Boshielo CT, Nyambi HT, Larsen A, Cheyip M, Getahun A, Pillay Y

Many people living with HIV in South Africa (SA) are not aware of their seropositive status and are diagnosed late during the course of HIV infection. These individuals do not obtain the full benefit from available HIV care and treatment services. This study sought to describe the prevalence of late presentation for HIV care among newly diagnosed HIV-positive individuals and evaluate sociodemographic variables associated with late presentation for HIV care in three high-burden districts of SA.

The study concludes that interventions that encourage early presentation for HIV care should be prioritised and should target males, non-pregnant women, individuals aged >30 years and those accessing care in facilities located in inner cities and urban townships.

April 18, 2018
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Tags
late diagnosis, late presentation for care

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