PrEP for key populations in combination HIV prevention in Nairobi: a mathematical modelling study

Cremin, Ide et al.

The HIV epidemic in the population of Nairobi as a whole is in decline, but a concentrated sub-epidemic persists in key populations. We aimed to identify an optimal portfolio of interventions to reduce HIV incidence for a given budget and to identify the circumstances in which pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) could be used in Nairobi, Kenya.

February 27, 2017
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Tags
Kenya, sub-epidemic, key populations, HIV prevention, HIV prevention interventions, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), PrEP

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