Predictors of timely linkage-to-ART within universal test and treat in the HPTN 071 (PopART) trial in Zambia and South Africa: findings from a nested case-control study

Sabapathy K, Mubekapi-Musadaidzwa C, Mulubwa C, Schaap A, Hoddinott G, Stangl A, Floyd S, Ayles H, Fidler S, Hayes R

HPTN 071 (PopART) is a three-arm community randomized trial in Zambia and South Africa evaluating the impact of a combination HIV prevention package, including universal test and treat (UTT), on HIV incidence. This nested study examined factors associated with timely linkage-to-care and ART initiation (TLA) (i.e. within six-months of referral) in the context of UTT within the intervention communities of the HPTN 071 (PopART) trial.

The lack of socio-demographic differences between cases and controls in the study is encouraging for a "universal" intervention that seeks to ensure high coverage across whole communities. Making clinics more "patient-friendly" could enhance treatment uptake further. The finding that those with higher risk behaviour are more actively engaging with UTT holds promise for treatment-as-prevention.

March 29, 2018
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Tags
HPTN 071 trial, PopART study, Zambia, South Africa, combination HIV prevention packages, universal test and treat (UTT), linkage to care, timely initiation of ART, treatment as prevention (TasP)

Similar Resources

Initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) following diagnosis of HIV infection at birth is an emerging area of paediatric HIV care. We present outcomes of HIV-infected infants identified at birth at Rahima Moosa Mother and Child Hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa.

An essential first step in caring for HIV-infected children is accurate and early diagnosis of HIV, early HIV testing, prompt return of results, and rapid initiation of treatment.

BACKGROUND:

The goal of virtual elimination of horizontal and mother-to-child HIV transmission in South Africa (SA) has been proposed, but there have been few systematic investigations of which interventions are likely to be most critical to reducing HIV incidence.

Advances in biomedical technologies provide potential for adolescent HIV prevention and HIV-positive survival.

To understand the uptake of HIV services by adolescent women, the authors conducted a retrospective analysis of patient-level data (2011–2013) on services for antenatal care (ANC) and prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) in 36 facilities in 5 districts in Zimbabwe.

Providing HIV testing at health facilities remains the most common approach to ensuring access to HIV treatment and prevention services for the millions of undiagnosed HIV-infected individuals in sub-Saharan Africa.

In 2006, WHO set forth its vision for a public health approach to delivering antiretroviral therapy. This approach has been broadly adopted in resource-poor settings and has provided the foundation for scaling up treatment to over 19·5 million people.

In 2016, an estimated 1.5 million females aged 15-24 years were living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Eastern and Southern Africa, where the prevalence of HIV infection among adolescent girls and young women (3.4%) is more than double that for males in the same age range (1…

Though timely initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a vital component of effective HIV prevention, care and treatment, people who inject drugs are less likely to receive ART than their non-drug using counterparts.

This study aimed to evaluate the impact of clinic-based prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) community support by trained lay health workers in addition to standard clinical care on PMTCT infant outcomes.