Pfhrp2-deleted Plasmodium falciparum parasites in the Democratic Republic of Congo: A national cross-sectional survey

Jonathan B. Parr et al.

Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) account for more than two-thirds of malaria diagnoses in Africa. Deletions of the Plasmodium falciparum hrp2 (pfhrp2) gene cause false-negative RDT results and have never been investigated on a national level. Spread of pfhrp2-deleted P. falciparum mutants, resistant to detection by HRP2-based RDTs, would represent a serious threat to malaria elimination efforts.

November 28, 2016
Year of publication
2016
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Tags
rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), malaria, malaria diagnosis, Plasmodium falciparum hrp2 (pfhrp2), malaria detection, elimination of malaria, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)

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