OBULAMU? website

Communication for Healthy Communities (CHC) Project

The Ministry of Health with support from the USAID-funded Communication for Healthy Communities project is implementing an integrated health communication platform called OBULAMU? which, in English translates to How’s Life? OBULAMU? is popular way of greeting in most parts of Uganda. It elicits responses that go beyond “good” or “bad” to enable the responder to give details about life context, feelings and emotions. In adopting the OBULAMU? phrase, the campaign design makes health an integral part of people’s daily lives, making it easy to talk about health issues relevant to the audience’s context. Additionally, the campaign seeks to position health in a fresh way that addresses barriers to behavior change, head-on with questions instead of messages, coupled with skills building to engage in dialogue, and turning such dialogue into action.

OBULAMU contributes to the reduction in HIV Infections, total fertility, maternal and child mortality, malnutrition, malaria and tuberculosis.

July 21, 2017
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Websites or databases
Tags
Uganda, health communication, behavior change, HIV prevention, HIV reduction, maternal and child mortality, malaria, tuberculosis, TB, malnutrition

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