Nurses' practice of integration of HIV prevention and sexual and reproductive health services in Ntcheu District, Malawi

Duma, S. E. and L. C. Ngala.

BACKGROUND: Nurses play a critical role in their practice of integrating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention and sexual and reproductive services to combat the spread of HIV and promote family planning in resource-constrained countries like Malawi.

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine and describe the nurses' practice of integration of HIV prevention and sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services as a strategy to effectively combat the spread of HIV and promote family planning in Malawi.

METHODS: A descriptive qualitative case study was used. The research question was: How do nurses practise the integration of family planning and HIV prevention services in Ntcheu District, Malawi? Qualitative data were collected using semi-structured interviews from a sample of 10 participants. Manual data analysis, using the five steps for interpretive content analysis, was used to analyse data.

RESULTS: Five themes were identified as (1) facilitation of access and acceptability of comprehensive HIV and family planning services, (2) educating and counselling patients, (3) early detection of HIV among women of child-bearing age, (4) professional benefits of integrating family planning and HIV prevention services and (5) resentment of integration of family planning and HIV prevention services.

CONCLUSION: The nurses' practice of integration of HIV prevention and SRH services has more benefits for both nurses and patients as a strategy to combat the spread of HIV and promote family planning in a resource-constrained country like Malawi.

October 7, 2019
Year of publication
2019
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Countries
Tags
sexual and reproductive health (SRH), integrated HIV and SRHR services, family planning

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