Nurse-led palliative care for HIV-positive patients taking antiretroviral therapy in Kenya: a randomised controlled trial

Lowther K, Selman L, Simms V, Gikaara N, Ahmed A, Ali Z, Kariuki H, Sherr L, Higginson IJ, Harding R

People with HIV accessing antiretroviral therapy (ART) have persistent physical, psychological, social, and spiritual problems, which are associated with poor quality of life and treatment outcomes. We assessed the effectiveness of a nurse-led palliative care intervention on patient-reported outcomes.

November 4, 2016
Year of publication
2015
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Tags
ART, treatment, antiretroviral therapy, ARVs, antiretroviral drugs, psychological well-being, mental health, nurse-led care, palliative care

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