Measuring the Quality of HIV/AIDS Client-Level Data Using Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS)

LQAS guide

Boone, D., Cloutier, S., & Lins, S.

Tools and methods for assessing data quality have significantly advanced, in part by the need for good HIV/AIDS data to inform programs. Most of the existing tools, however, focus on aggregate data at subnational levels. Very few tools measure the quality of data at the primary source– individual client documents at health facilities and beneficiary documents for community-based programs. Reviewing the quality of data in these types of documents is time consuming and resource intensive. A triage system using lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS), a rapid survey method, can be implemented to identify acceptable or unacceptable source documents using a small sample of records.

Measuring the Quality of HIV/AIDS Client-Level Data Using Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) was developed to describe how to sample HIV/AIDS client or beneficiary records and classify them according to quality, with a quantifiable level of confidence. The LQAS method saves time, effort, and resources while yielding statistically sound results with quantifiable confidence and error.

This guide was developed to describe how to sample HIV/AIDS client or beneficiary records and classify them according to quality, with a quantifiable level of confidence. The intended audience for this guide is supervisory staff. When used as part of a routine system of data quality assurance, LQAS will improve HIV/AIDS data in source documents, allowing for improved client and beneficiary management. Since data quality issues will be identified and resolved at the source, aggregate data that are reported to national programs will be more accurate.

A companion Excel tool - the LQAS Triage System Data Collection and Analysis Tool - is available here.

October 2, 2019
Year of publication
2019
Resource types
Programmatic guidance
Tags
data quality, LQAS, Lot Quality Assurance Sampling, client records, beneficiary records

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