LGBTI-Psychosocial Services and Support Adolescents and Young People in Gauteng, Pretoria South Africa: Profiling the Psychosocial Support Services of OUT (Servicing the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community)

Leon Swartz and Gerda Erasmus

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) case study was undertaken by the National Population Unit (NPU) to assess the activities that are run by the organisation OUT. This study forms part of 10 such studies with regard to youth which was undertaken by the NPU. The study made use of a mixed method approach where the qualitative aspect was the dominant method. The main aim of the study was to assess how OUT provides Psychosocial Support Services to the (LGBTI) community including HIV counselling, general lifestyle counselling as well as advice and support. This programme focuses on the psychosocial well-being of LGBTI individuals and communities. This psychosocial support services forms part of the mission and vision of OUT. The study found that LGBTI individuals still experience stigma and discrimination although the South African constitution and Bill of Rights ensure the protection of the rights of all South African citizens. The study made some recommendations in this regard.

February 7, 2017
Year of publication
2016
Resource types
Case studies and success stories, Journal and research articles, Reports and Fact sheets
Countries
Tags
South Africa, LGBTI, stigma and discrimination, HIV counselling, psychosocial support services, psychosocial support (PSS)

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