Lesotho: Lives on the line: sex work in sub-Saharan Africa

Adele Baleta

Sex workers in sub-Saharan Africa face physical abuse and a high burden of disease because of criminalisation, stigmatisation, and poverty. Adele Baleta reports on the sitation in Lesotho.

March 23, 2016
Year of publication
2014
Countries
Tags
sex work, sex workers, HIV, HIV prevention, treatment, key populations, criminalization of sex work, stigma and discrimination, access to services, Lesotho

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